Career Descriptions

Information on careers in the trucking industry
Driver

Long Haul Driver

Long distance drives usually completed overnight or longer.

Pickup and Delivery Driver

Short distance with multiple stops to pick-up and/or deliver goods, usually starts from and finishes at home terminal daily.
Shunt Drive

Driver training base for many drivers. Involves moving trailers between loading docks or bays on private property at loading/unloading facilities.

Owner-Operator Driver

A driver owns tractor and sometimes trailer to contract with a carrier to operate under the carrier’s authority. He/She operates as a separate independently owned business entity.

Combination Driver/Dock Worker

Assists in loading/unloading trailers at home terminal as opposed to driving preloaded vehicles.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Operations

Billing Clerk

Often part time position for students in evenings. Involves data entry of completed moves with corresponding freight rates.

Customer Services

Service customers through tracing shipments, as well as responding to customer complaints.

Dispatcher – Local

The local dispatcher co-ordinates drivers and equipment to handle shipments between cities. Usually involves mid to long distance movements.

Dock Supervisor

The dock supervisor is responsible for seeing to proper loading and unloading of freight at the carrier’s terminal.

Operations Manager

The operations manager is responsible for ensuring that all operations in the terminal are efficient and cost effective without jeopardizing the set level of customer service.

Terminal Manager

The terminal manager reports to the head office and is directly responsible for the profitability of the terminal.

Driver/Trainer/Supervisor

The driver/trainer/supervisor is responsible for ensuring that drivers operate equipment as safely and efficiently as possible. He/she assists in upgrading a driver’s skills, and orientating new recruits to the carrier’s operations procedures.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Sales & Marketing

Sales Representative

Calls on shippers’ traffic decision makers in attempt to secure freight for the carrier.

Telemarketing Agent

Markets trucking company to potential shippers via telephone. Necessary since trucking companies cover a broader area than the sales staff.

Marketing Manager

Sets marketing goals for company and directs relative personnel to achieve goals. Liaises with Sales, Operations, and Finance.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Maintenance

Truck & Coach Technician

Licensed as technician through apprenticeship training program. Maintains mechanical components of trucks, tractors and trailers.

Truck & Trailer Service Technician

Repairs, overhauls, inspects and maintains suspension, brake and electrical systems on trailers.

Truck & Coach Technician

Licensed as technician through apprenticeship training program. Maintains mechanical components of trucks, tractors and trailers.

Truck & Trailer Service Technician

Repairs, overhauls, inspects and maintains suspension, brake and electrical systems on trailers.

Wheel Installer/Tire Technician

Ensures that trucks, truck-tractors and trailers are equipped with safe and properly functioning wheels and tires at all times. Wheel installers in Ontario must be certified to do so.

Parts Supply and Control

Ensures that necessary parts are available. Responsible for maintaining adequate and efficient inventory as well as purchasing parts on a competitive basis from a variety of suppliers.

Shop Floor Supervisor

Co-ordinates, schedules and inspects work of mechanics. Prioritizes jobs. Involves key decision-making.

Maintenance Manager

Responsible for developing and implementing preventative maintenance programs. Ensures that maintenance function is efficient and effective.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Safety, Personnel, Insurance

Safety Supervisor

Supervises written and road test for drives, conducts safety meetings, and educates personnel on health and safety issues. Ensures that company is operating in compliance with a variety of regulations. Also responsible for investigating accidents.

Insurance Manager

Administers some or all of company’s insurance programs including worker’s compensation, benefits packages and fleet insurance. Responsible for negotiating premium rates and ensuring correct remittance.

Personnel Clerk

Day-to-day record keeping and updating of personnel files. May assist the safety supervisor with complying with safety laws relating to personnel.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Industrial Relations

Manager Industrial Relations

Ensures compliance with collective agreement through understanding and interpreting the Master Freight Agreement negotiates with local unions and educates management to conform to collective agreement.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Information Technology

System Analyst

The systems analyst develops and implements systems to accommodate the needs of the user.

Programmer

Maintains the computer software, writes and modifies programs used to run the business.

Database Administrator

Monitors all aspects of the database including planning for growth, performing upgrades and archiving historical information.

Network Administrator

Install, configure and troubleshoot PCS and their peripherals and set-up and monitor local area and wide area networks.

IT Manager

Ultimately responsible for all information and communication systems.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Traffic

Sales Representative

Calls on shippers’ traffic decision makers in attempt to secure freight for the carrier.

Rate Clerk

The rate clerk assigns carrier’s rates to pro bills or bills of lading for invoicing to customers.

Transportation/Pricing Analyst

The analyst audits rate bills for accuracy and publishes pricing packages to meet customer’s needs. Determines company’s lane profitability. Approves pricing policies and applies them to movements.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Administration

Customer Service Representative

Responsible for booking new shipments, following up on customer inquiries and dealing with customers to sort out freight claims which can consist of missing or damaged freight.

Accountant/Bookkeeper/Controller

Accounts Receivable personnel insure that working capital – the money – owed by customers is
collected, and that invoices and receipts are accurate. Accounts Payable personnel ensure that vendors are paid correctly and on time so that the company can continue to purchase supplies. Controllers or Accounting Managers liaise with banks and finance companies to ensure that there is always an accurate financial picture available on which to base financial decisions.

Payroll Clerk/Supervisor

Payroll ensures accurate compensation to employees through various methods of pay, ie: amount per mile traveled, and owner-operators hourly wages or additional “pick-up/delivery” rates.

Licensing & Permitting

This department is responsible for ensuring that vehicles are legally able to operate wherever and whenever required. This includes licensing vehicles and maintaining the records necessary to calculate the multitude of taxes and fees imposed on road carriers.

Sales/Fuel Tax Administrator

The administrator is responsible for ensuring that each jurisdictions tax requirements are met and that accurate records are maintained in the event of a compliance audit.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.

Claims, Claims Prevention & Security

Claims Agent

Resolves customer claims involving “over, short or damaged” freight.

Freight Claims

Establishes claim files and negotiates compensation with the customer. Corresponds with customer as well as company insurers.

The trucking industry employs over 400,000 Canadians of which approximately 235,000 are truck drivers. As a result of this growing industry, there are an additional 280,000 Canadians employed as goods and services suppliers to the industry. The career links describe some of the many careers available within the trucking industry. There are various training institutions and programs available to put you on the right track towards a long-lasting and challenging career. For more information, please contact us.